Dinoflagellate

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{acid, form, water}
{island, water, area}
{math, energy, light}
{woman, child, man}
{car, race, vehicle}

Dinophyceae
Noctiluciphyceae
Syndiniophyceae

The dinoflagellates (Greek δῖνος dinos "whirling" and Latin flagellum "whip, scourge") are a large group of flagellate protists. Most are marine plankton, but they are common in fresh water habitats as well. Their populations are distributed depending on temperature, salinity, or depth. About half of all dinoflagellates are photosynthetic, and these make up the largest group of marine eukaryotic algae aside from the diatoms. Being primary producers makes them an important part of the aquatic food chain. Some species, called zooxanthellae, are endosymbionts of marine animals and protozoa, and play an important part in the biology of coral reefs. Other dinoflagellates are colorless predators on other protozoa, and a few forms are parasitic (see for example Oodinium, Pfiesteria).

This group is also known as the order Dinoflagellata[1] or the class Dinophyceae.[2]

An algal bloom of dinoflagellates can result in a visible coloration of the water colloquially known as red tide.

Contents

Classification

In 1753 the first modern dinoflagellates were described by Baker and named by Muller in 1773.[3] The term derives from the Greek word δῖνος (dinos), meaning 'whirling,' and Latin flagellum, a diminutive term for a whip or scourge.

These same dinoflagellates were first defined by Otto Bütschli in 1885 as the flagellate order dinoflagellida. Botanists treated them as a division of algae, named Pyrrophyta or Pyrrhophyta ("fire algae"; Greek pyrr(h)os, fire) after the bioluminescent forms, or Dinophyta. At various times the cryptomonads, ebriids, and ellobiopsids have been included here, but only the last are now considered close relatives. Dinoflagellates have a known ability to transform from non-cyst to cyst-forming strategies which makes it extremely difficult to recreate their evolutionary history.

Full article ▸

related documents
Discus (fish)
Hummingbird
Monk Parakeet
Carnivore
Hagfish
List of freshwater aquarium fish species
Pelican
Herbivory
Peppered moth
Aye-aye
Pinophyta
Ctenophore
Scorpion
Lovebird
Mitochondrial Eve
Bryozoa
Bombyx mori
Pharaoh Hound
Dolphin
Tortoise
Lyrebird
Salamander
Armadillo
Squirrel
Passerine
Mussel
Steller Sea Lion
Peccary
Manta ray
Carboniferous