Diphthong

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{language, word, form}
{@card@, make, design}
{game, team, player}
{line, north, south}
{car, race, vehicle}

A diphthong (pronounced /ˈdɪfθɒŋ/ or /ˈdɪpθɒŋ/;[1] from Greek δίφθογγος, diphthongos, literally "two sounds" or "two tones"), also known as a gliding vowel, refers to two adjacent vowel sounds occurring within the same syllable. Technically, a diphthong is a vowel with two different targets: That is, the tongue moves during the pronunciation of the vowel. In most dialects of English, the words eye, hay, boy, low, and cow contain diphthongs.

Diphthongs contrast with monophthongs, where the tongue doesn't move and only one vowel sound is heard in a syllable.  Where two adjacent vowel sounds occur in different syllables, as in, for example, the English word re-elect, the result is described as hiatus, not as a diphthong.

Diphthongs often form when separate vowels are run together in rapid speech during a conversation. However, there are also unitary diphthongs, as in the English examples above, which are heard by listeners as single-vowel sounds (phonemes).[2]

Contents

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Transliteration
Received Pronunciation
Pittsburgh English
Suppletion
Austrian German
Count noun
A and an
Austro-Bavarian
General American
Grammatical person
Norn language
Declension
Phonetic complement
Michif language
G
Greek language
Schwa
Japanese numerals
American English
Full stop
Grammar
Romansh language
Linguistic typology
International Sign
Verner's law
Igbo language
Australian English
Tāna
Expletive
Arabic numerals