Dojo

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{school, student, university}
{god, call, give}
{service, military, aircraft}
{theory, work, human}
{group, member, jewish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{water, park, boat}

A dojo (道場 dōjō?) is a Japanese term which literally means "place of the way". Initially, dōjōs were adjunct to temples. The term can refer to a formal training place for any of the Japanese do arts but typically it is considered the formal gathering place for students of any Japanese martial arts style to conduct training, examinations and other related encounters.

The concept of a dōjō as a martial arts training place is a Western concept; in Japan, any physical training facility, including professional wrestling schools, may be called dōjō depending on the context.

Contents

Martial arts dōjō

A proper Japanese martial arts dōjō is considered special and is well cared for by its users. Shoes are not worn in a dōjō. In many styles it is traditional to conduct a ritual cleaning (sōji) of the dōjō at the beginning and/or end of each training session. Besides the obvious hygienic benefits of regular cleaning it also serves to reinforce the fact that dōjō are supposed to be supported and managed by the student body, not the school's instructional staff. This attitude has become lost in many modern, commercial dōjō that are founded and run by a small group of people or instructors. In fact, it is not uncommon that in traditional schools (koryu), dōjō are rarely used for training at all, instead being reserved for more symbolic or formal occasions. The actual training is conducted typically outdoors or in a less formal area.

Many traditional dōjō follow a prescribed pattern with shomen ("front") and various entrances that are used based on student and instructor rank laid out precisely. Typically students will enter in the lower-left corner of the dōjō (in reference to the shomen) with instructors in the upper right corner. Shomen typically contains kamidana—an area for a Shintō shrine and other artifacts. The term kamiza is frequently confused by martial arts practitioners with the Kamidana. Many other artifacts may be displayed throughout the dōjō, such as kanban that authorize the school in a style or strategy, and items such as taiko drums or armor (yoroi). It is not uncommon to find the name of the dōjō and the dōjō kun (roughly "dōjō rules") displayed prominently at shomen as well. Visitors also typically have a special place reserved, depending on their rank and station. Weapons and other training gear will normally be found on the back wall.

The Noma dōjō in Tokyo is an example of a traditional kendō dōjō.

Full article ▸

related documents
Indy grab
Lithic reduction
Hangman's knot
Beadwork
Nutcracker
Jumper dress
Adjustable spanner
Wakizashi
Fisting
Pressed flower craft
Granny knot
German euro coins
Hewing
Woodworking joints
Hairpin
Boxing ring
Banner-making
Genbukan
Carat (mass)
Abatis
Indigo
Surcoat
Ground stone
Diapering
James Hargreaves
Ka-Bar
Prismatic blade
Body art
Fasces
Heelflip