Donna, Texas

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Donna is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 14,768 at the 2000 census. The city's motto is "The Heart of the Valley." (Rio Grande Valley)

The motto is "The City with a Heart, In the Heart of the Valley."

Donna is part of the McAllenEdinburgMission Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

History

Donna is named for Donna Hooks, daughter of T. J. Hooks who, beginning in 1900, did quite a bit of land development work in the then frontier world of the Rio Grande Valley.

The region was originally part of the La Blanca Land Grant, given to Lino Cabazos on May 18, 1834. The first Anglo-American Settler was John F. Webber, who in 1839 moved to escape persecution of his marriage to Sylvia Hector, a former slave.

In 1902, Thomas Jefferson Hooks formed the LaBlanca Agricultural Company, which purchased 23,000 acres (93 km²) in Hidalgo County. Part of this purchase was given to his daughter, Donna Hooks Fletcher, a divorcee. In 1904, The St. Louis, Brownsville, and Mexico Railway reached the area, and a town was formed that July. In 1907, the town was given a depot station, which was named Donna in Hooks' honor.


Donna is off U.S. Highway 83 and State Spur 374, fourteen miles southeast of McAllen in southeastern Hidalgo County. It is in territory that was granted to Lino Cabazos as part of the La Blanca land grant on May 19, 1834, by the Mexican state of Tamaulipas. The Cabazos family inhabited the area for at least twenty years after taking possession of the land, and their descendants continued to live in the area into the twentieth century. The first known Anglo-American settler was John F. Webber, who, accompanied by his wife Sylvia (Hector), a former slave, settled in the area in 1839. The Webbers moved to the area in order to escape persecution for their interracial marriage.

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