Dragonfly

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{god, call, give}
{@card@, make, design}
{language, word, form}
{island, water, area}
{water, park, boat}
{service, military, aircraft}
{country, population, people}

A dragonfly is an insect belonging to the order Odonata, the suborder Epiprocta or, in the strict sense, the infraorder Anisoptera. It is characterized by large multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong transparent wings, and an elongated body. Dragonflies are similar to damselflies, but the adults can be differentiated by the fact that the wings of most dragonflies are held away from, and perpendicular to, the body when at rest. Dragonflies possess six legs (like any other insect), but most of them cannot walk well. Dragonflies are some of the fastest insects in world.

Dragonflies are valuable predators that eat mosquitoes, and other small insects like flies, bees, ants, and very rarely butterflies. They are usually found around lakes, ponds, streams and wetlands because their larvae, known as "nymphs", are aquatic.

Contents

Etymology

Anisoptera comes from the Greek an meaning not, iso meaning equal, and ptera meaning wings. Their hind wings are broader than their fore wings.

Life cycle

Female dragonflies lay eggs in or near water, often on floating or emergent plants. When laying eggs, some species will submerge themselves completely in order to lay their eggs on a good surface. The eggs then hatch into nymphs. Most of a dragonfly's life is spent in the nymph form, beneath the water's surface, using extendable jaws to catch other invertebrates (often mosquito larvae) or even vertebrates such as tadpoles and fish.[1][2][3][4] They breathe through gills in their rectum, and can rapidly propel themselves by suddenly expelling water through the anus.[5] Some nymphs even hunt on land,[6] an aptitude which could easily have been more common in ancient times when terrestrial predators were clumsier.

Full article ▸

related documents
Evergreen bagworm
Differences between butterflies and moths
Spore
Graptolite
Fox
Wombat
Quagga
Millipede
Fennec Fox
American Goldfinch
Ovum
Slime mold
Fig wasp
Brachiopod
Phoronid
Genome
Euphorbia
Red Wolf
Emu
Gibbon
Przewalski's Horse
Narwhal
English Setter
Green Iguana
Carolina Parakeet
Mycorrhiza
Red Slender Loris
Siamese (cat)
Female
Walrus