Duesberg hypothesis

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The Duesberg hypothesis is the claim, associated with University of California, Berkeley professor Peter Duesberg, that various non-infectious factors such as recreational and pharmaceutical drug use are the cause of AIDS, and that HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is merely a harmless passenger virus.[1] The most prominent defenders of this hypothesis are Duesberg himself, biochemist and vitamin proponent David Rasnick, and journalist Celia Farber. The scientific community considers that Duesberg's arguments are the result of cherry-picking predominantly outdated scientific data[2] and selectively ignoring evidence in favour of HIV's role in AIDS.[3] The scientific consensus is that the Duesberg hypothesis is incorrect, and that HIV is the cause of AIDS.[4][5][6]

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Role of legal and illegal drug use

Duesberg argues that there is a statistical correlation between trends in recreational drug use and trends in AIDS cases.[7] He argues that the epidemic of AIDS cases in the 1980s corresponds to a supposed epidemic of recreational drug use in the United States and Europe during the same time frame.

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