East Renfrewshire

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East Renfrewshire (Scots: Aest Renfrewshire, Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Rinn Friù an Ear) is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. Until 1975 it formed part of the county of Renfrewshire for local government purposes along with the modern council areas of Renfrewshire and Inverclyde. Although no longer a local authority area, Renfrewshire still remains the registration county and lieutenancy area of East Renfrewshire.

The East Renfrewshire local authority was formed in 1996, as a successor to the Eastwood district, along with Barrhead, which came from Renfrew district. It borders onto North Ayrshire, East Ayrshire, Renfrewshire, South Lanarkshire and the City of Glasgow.

Contents

East Renfrewshire Council

The leader of East Renfrewshire Council is Cllr. Jim Fletcher (Labour - Giffnock & Thornliebank) and the Civic Leader is Provost Alex Mackie (Liberal Democrat - Giffnock & Thornliebank). The first provost of East Renfrewshire was Cllr. Allan Cameron Steele MBE JP, serving two terms in the office between 1996 and 2003. Provost Steele's son, also Allan, has attempted to follow in his father's footsteps although with notably less electoral success, suffering defeat in the 1999 council election, 2001 Westminster election and 2003 Scottish parliamentary election.

A 2001 survey showed that about half of Scotland's Jewish population lives in East Renfrewshire.

In a 2007 Reader's Digest poll, East Renfrewshire was voted the second best place in the UK to raise a family, ranking just behind East Dunbartonshire on the northwest side of Glasgow. [1]

In January 2008 East Renfrewshire became the first Scottish local authority to create a Facebook page to publicise its services.[2]

Political composition

• denotes coalition parties

Demographics

The results of the 2001 census were as follows:

  • White - 96.19% - 86,196
    • White British - 93.49% - 83,776
    • White Irish - 1.3% - 1165
    • Other White - 1.4% - 1255
  • Mixed Race - 0.21% - 188
  • South Asian - 2.93% - 2,626
    • Indian - 0.77% - 690
    • Pakistani - 1.98% - 1774
    • Bangladeshi - 0.01% - 9
    • Other South Asian - 0.17% - 153
  • Black - 0.071% - 63
    • Black Caribbean - 0.03% - 27
    • Black African - 0.04% - 35
    • Other Black - 0.001% - 1
  • Chinese - 0.38% - 340
  • Other - 0.21% - 197

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