Edain

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In the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Edain (pronounced /ˈɛdaɪn/) were men (humans) who made their way into Beleriand in the First Age, and were friendly to the Elves.

The Sindarin word Edain (The second syllable is pronounced as English dine rather than English dane; the stress falls on the first syllable), singular Adan (Quenya Atani, Atan) literally meant Second People, and originally referred to all Men, but later it only applied to the Men of Beleriand and their descendants. The Quenya term Atani kept its old meaning.

They were divided in three large houses, or tribes:

The Bëorians and Marachians shared a common tongue, and were known to each other before settling in Beleriand. The tongue of the Haladin was alien to them.

The House of Bëor was nearly wiped out by Morgoth, and the remainder of its people merged with the Hadorians to become the Númenóreans. It would seem that the Haladin of Beleriand were completely wiped out, or at least disappeared as a separate people.

When the Númenóreans returned to Middle-earth in the Second Age, they encountered many Men who were obviously related to the Atani: they classified these Men as Middle Men, and established friendly relations with them. Examples are the Rohirrim, the Men of Dale, and the Breelanders.

Other Men, such as the Dunlendings, were not recognised as Middle Men because they were related to the Haladin rather than Bëorians or Marachians, and they were hostile to Númenor.

A fourth kind of Men came with the Second House, and called themselves Drughu. This name was adopted in Sindarin as Drúedain or Drû-folk. They were a strange people, living with the Haladin (and possibly related to them) in the forest of Brethil, some even apparently made it to Númenor, but they died out or had left before the Akallabêth. In the Third Age, their kin were known as the Woses[1] of Drúadan forest.

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