Enlil

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Enlil (nlin), (EN = Lord + LIL = Loft, "Lord of the Open" or "Lord of the Wind")[1] was the name of a chief deity listed and written about in ancient Sumerian, Akkadian, Hittite, Canaanite and other Mesopotamian clay and stone tablets. The name is perhaps pronounced and sometimes rendered in translations as Ellil in later Akkadian, Hittite, and Canaanite literature.

Enlil was considered to be the god of breath, wind, loft, and breadth.[2]

Contents

Origins

One story names his origins as the exhausted breath of An (god of the heavens) and Ki (goddess of the Earth) after sexual union.

When Enlil was a young god, he was banished from Dilmun, home of the gods, to Kur, the underworld for raping a goddess named Ninlil. Ninlil followed him to the underworld where she bore his first child, Nergal, and/or the moon god Sin (Sumerian Nanna/Suen). After fathering three more underworld-deities (substitutes for Sin), Enlil was allowed to return to Dilmun.[3][4]

Enlil was known as the inventor of the mattock (key agricultural tool of the Sumerians) and caused plants to grow.[5]

Cosmological role

Enlil, along with Anu/An, Enki and Ninhursag were gods of the Sumerians.[6]

By his wife Ninlil or Sud, Enlil was father of the moon god Nanna/Suen (in Akkadian, Sin) and of Ninurta (also called Ningirsu). Enlil is the father of Nisaba the goddess of grain, of Pabilsag who is sometimes equated with Ninurta, and sometimes of Enbilulu. By Ereshkigal Enlil was father of Namtar.

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