Epistle of Jude

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The Epistle of Jude, usually referred to simply as Jude, is the penultimate book of the New Testament and is attributed to Jude, the brother of James the Just[1].

Contents

Composition

The letter of Jude was one of the disputed books of the Canon. Although its canonical status was contested, its authenticity was never doubted by the Early Church. The links between the Epistle and 2 Peter, its use of the Apocryphal Books, and its brevity raised concern.[2]

Canonical status

Though it is held as canonical in the majority of Christian churches, some scholars consider the letter a pseudonymous work written between the end of the 1st century and the first quarter of the 2nd century, arguing from the references to the apostles,[3] tradition;[4] the book's competent Greek style and the opposition to Gnosticism. Nevertheless, conservative scholars date it between 66 to 90.[5][6][7]

"More remarkable is the evidence that by the end of the second century Jude was widely accepted as canonical."[8] Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian and the Muratorian canon considered the letter canonical. The first historical record of doubts as to authorship are found in the writings of Origen of Alexandria, who spoke of the doubts held by some—albeit not him. Eusebius classified it with the "disputed writings, the antilegomena." The letter was eventually accepted as part of the Canon by the Church Fathers such as Athanasius and the Synods of Laodicea (c. 363) and Carthage (397). Doubts regarding Jude's authenticity were revived at the time of the Protestant Reformation.[clarification needed]

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