Epistle to Titus

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The Epistle of Paul to Titus, usually referred to simply as Titus, is one of the three Pastoral Epistles (with 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy), traditionally attributed to Saint Paul, and is part of the New Testament. It describes the requirements and duties of elders and bishops.[1]

Contents

Recipient

Not mentioned in the Acts of the Apostles, he was noted in Galatians (cf. Gal. 2:1, 3) where Paul writes of journeying to Jerusalem with Barnabas, accompanied by Titus. He was then dispatched to Corinth, Greece, where he successfully reconciled the Christian community there with Paul, its founder. Titus was later left on the island of Crete to help organize the Church, although he soon went to Dalmatia, Croatia. According to Eusebius of Caesarea in the Ecclesiastical History, he served as the first bishop of Crete. He was buried in Cortyna (Gortyna), Crete; his head was later translated to Venice during the invasion of Crete by the Saracens in 832 and was enshrined in St. Mark’s, Venice, Italy.

Composition

A few scholars are divided as to the authenticity of the pastoral epistles.[1] It is predominantly considered to be one of the Pastoral epistles to have be written by the same author (i.e. Paul). Titus has a very close affinity with 1 Timothy, sharing similar phrases and expressions and similar subject matter.[2][3] While these epistles are traditionally attributed to Paul of Tarsus, there are a few scholars who consider them pseudepigraphical. Generally, and historically, however, it is accepted by Catholic, Orthodox, and Evangelical Christians as the work of Paul. Upon recently completing a journey to Crete and the establishment of new churches there, he wrote to instruct the church leaders (i.e., Titus). In order to see that these churches were properly established (as was Paul's typical pattern, see Acts 14:21–23), Paul left Titus in Crete. The existence of false teachers (Titus 1:10–16) amid the fledgling churches heightens the intensity of the situation.

Pauline Authenticity

The author of Titus identifies himself as "Paul, a servant of God and an apostle of Jesus Christ." According to Easton's Bible Dictionary, "Paul's Authorship was undisputed in antiquity, and was probably written about the same time as the First Epistle to Timothy, with which it has many affinities."

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