Erik Satie

related topics
{album, band, music}
{theory, work, human}
{son, year, death}
{work, book, publish}
{film, series, show}
{church, century, christian}
{day, year, event}
{@card@, make, design}
{group, member, jewish}
{woman, child, man}
{build, building, house}
{game, team, player}
{school, student, university}

Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (17 May 1866 – Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a "gymnopedist" in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a "phonometrician" (meaning "someone who measures sounds") preferring this designation to that of a "musician", after having been called "a clumsy but subtle technician" in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.[1]

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American top culture chronicle Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. His work was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.[citation needed]

Contents

Life and work

From Normandy to Montmartre

Erik Satie was born at Honfleur, and his home there is now open to the public. His youth was spent alternating between Honfleur, Basse-Normandie, and Paris. When he was four years old, his family moved to Paris, his father (Alfred), having been offered a translator's job in the capital. After his mother (born Jane Leslie Anton, who was born in London to Scottish parents) died in 1872, he was sent, together with his younger brother Conrad, back to Honfleur, to live with his paternal grandparents. There he received his first music lessons from a local organist. When his grandmother died in 1878, the two brothers were reunited with their father in Paris, who remarried (a piano teacher) shortly afterwards. From the early 1880s onwards, Alfred Satie started publishing salon compositions (by his new wife and himself, among others).

Full article ▸

related documents
Andrés Segovia
Arnold Schoenberg
Maurice Ravel
Harmony
Industrial music
György Ligeti
Robin Gibb
Freddie Mercury
Free improvisation
Dizzy Gillespie
Overtone singing
Dennis Brain
Percussion instrument
Phil Keaggy
Lacrimosa (band)
Patti Smith
Rock opera
Eva Cassidy
Anita O'Day
Presence
Ian MacKaye
Lisa Lopes
Seal (musician)
Bootsy Collins
John Lee Hooker
Ronnie James Dio
Joe Jackson (musician)
Skyhooks
Randy Stonehill
Monster Magnet