Essenes

related topics
{god, call, give}
{group, member, jewish}
{theory, work, human}
{church, century, christian}
{work, book, publish}
{law, state, case}
{language, word, form}
{land, century, early}
{island, water, area}
{city, population, household}
{woman, child, man}
{school, student, university}
{area, part, region}
{food, make, wine}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{town, population, incorporate}
{village, small, smallsup}

The Essenes (Hebrew: אִסִּיִים, Isiyim; Greek: Εσσηνοι, Εσσαίοι, or Οσσαιοι; Essēnoi, Essaioi, Ossaioi) were a Jewish religious group that flourished from the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE that some scholars claim seceded from the Zadokite priests.[1] Being much fewer in number than the Pharisees and the Sadducees (the other two major sects at the time) the Essenes lived in various cities but congregated in communal life dedicated to asceticism, voluntary poverty, daily immersion, and abstinence from worldly pleasures, including marriage. Many separate but related religious groups of that era shared similar mystic, eschatological, messianic, and ascetic beliefs. These groups are collectively referred to by various scholars as the "Essenes." Josephus records that Essenes existed in large numbers, and thousands lived throughout Judæa. The Essenes believed they were the last generation of the last generations and anticipated Teacher of Righteousness, Aaronic High Priest,[citation needed] and High Guard Messiah,[citation needed] similar to the Prophet, Priest and King expectations of the Pharisees. The Essenes have gained fame in modern times as a result of the discovery of an extensive group of religious documents known as the Dead Sea Scrolls, commonly believed to be their library. These documents include preserved multiple copies of the Hebrew Bible untouched from as early as 300 BCE until their discovery in 1946. Some scholars, however, dispute the notion that the Essenes wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls.[2] One scholar, Rachel Elior, even argues that the group never existed.[3][4][5]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Ancient Egyptian religion
Haoma
Amitābha
Helios
Cyclops
Hestia
Cernunnos
Mut
Cabeiri
Garuda
Titan (mythology)
Pan (mythology)
Amalek
Dragon (Middle-earth)
Bharadwaja
Rhea (mythology)
Castor and Pollux
Avatar
Cthulhu
Hathor
Hesiod
Proteus
Melqart
Manna
Deuterocanonical books
Son of God
Gospel
Angra Mainyu
Palm Sunday
Adonis