Ethernet

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Ethernet is a family of frame-based computer networking technologies for local area networks (LANs). The name came from the physical concept of the ether. It defines a number of wiring and signaling standards for the Physical Layer of the OSI networking model as well as a common addressing format and Media Access Control at the Data Link Layer.

Ethernet is standardized as IEEE 802.3. The combination of the twisted pair versions of Ethernet for connecting end systems to the network, along with the fiber optic versions for site backbones, is the most widespread wired LAN technology. It has been used from around 1980[1] to the present, largely replacing competing LAN standards such as token ring, FDDI, and ARCNET.

Contents

History

Ethernet was developed at Xerox PARC between 1973 and 1975.[2] It was inspired by ALOHAnet, which Robert Metcalfe had studied as part of his Ph.D. dissertation.[3] In 1975, Xerox filed a patent application listing Metcalfe, David Boggs, Chuck Thacker and Butler Lampson as inventors.[4] In 1976, after the system was deployed at PARC, Metcalfe and Boggs published a seminal paper.[5][note 1]

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