Everyman (play)

related topics
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{film, series, show}
{law, state, case}
{day, year, event}
{country, population, people}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{church, century, christian}
{group, member, jewish}

Everyman
Messenger
God
Death
Fellowship
Kindred
Cousin
Goods
Good Deeds
Knowledge
Confession
Beauty
Strength
Discretion
Five Wits
Angel

The Somonyng of Everyman (The Summoning of Everyman), usually referred to simply as Everyman, is a late 15th-century English morality play. Like John Bunyan's novel Pilgrim's Progress, Everyman examines the question of Christian salvation by use of allegorical characters, and what Man must do to attain it. The premise is that the good and evil deeds of one's life will be tallied by God after death, as in a ledger book. The play is the allegorical accounting of the life of Everyman, who represents all mankind. In the course of the action, Everyman tries to convince other characters to accompany him in the hope of improving his account. All the characters are also allegorical, each personifying an abstract idea such as Fellowship, (material) Goods, and Knowledge. The conflict between good and evil is dramatized by the interactions between characters.

Contents

Sources

Nothing is known of the author, however, the play was apparently produced with some frequency in the seventy-five years following its composition, no production records survive.[1]

There is a similar Dutch (Flemish) morality play of the same period called Elckerlijc. Scholars have yet to reach an agreement on whether Everyman is a translation of this play, or derived independently from a Latin work named Homulus.

Setting

Like the characters, the setting is allegorical: God speaks from heaven, then sends Death to earth to seek Everyman, who ascends to heaven in the final scene. Figuratively, the setting is anywhere on earth.

The cultural setting is based on the Roman Catholicism of the era. Everyman attains afterlife in heaven by means of good works and the Catholic Sacraments, in particular Confession, Penance, Unction, Viaticum and receiving the Holy Eucharist.

Synopsis

The oldest surviving example of the script begins with this paragraph on the first page (reproduced below):

"Here begynneth a treatyse how þe hye Fader of Heven sendeth Dethe to somon every creature to come and gyve acounte of theyr lyves in this worlde, and is in maner of a morall playe."

[Here beginneth a treatise how the high Father of Heaven sendeth Death to summon every creature to come and give account of their lives in this world, and is in manner of a moral play.]

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