Fëanor

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Fëanor is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, featured prominently in The Silmarillion. He was the eldest son of Finwë, the High King of the Noldor, and his first wife Míriel Serindë. Fëanor's mother, Míriel, died shortly after giving birth, having given all her strength and essence to him.

Finwë remarried, and had two more sons, Fëanor's half-brothers Fingolfin and Finarfin, and two daughters, Findis and Irimë.

Fëanor is best known as the creator of three gems, the Silmarils, which figure prominently in The Silmarillion. His name is a compromise between Faenor (in Tolkien's fictional language of Sindarin) and Fëanáro, meaning "Spirit of fire" (in Quenya, another of Tolkien's invented languages). He was originally named Finwë or Finwion after his father and later Curufinwë ("Skilful (son of) Finwë"). Fëanor wedded Nerdanel daughter of Mahtan, who bore him seven sons: Maedhros, Maglor, Celegorm, Caranthir, Curufin, Amrod and Amras.

Contents

Early life

Fëanor was the student of Mahtan, who was himself a student of the Vala Aulë. He was a craftsman and gem-smith, inventor of the Tengwar script. He also was the creator of the palantíri (a feat which is said by Gandalf to be beyond the skill of both Sauron and Saruman), and was said to have created the Elfstone in one version of its history.

Silmarils

Fëanor, at the pinnacle of his might,

in the greatest of his achievements, captured the light of the Two Trees to make the three Silmarils, also called the Great Jewels, though they were not mere glittering stones, they were alive, imperishable, and sacred.

Even the Valar, including Aulë, could not copy them. In fact, Fëanor himself could not copy them, as part of his essence went into their making. Their worth, in Tolkien's universe, was close to infinite, even to the Valar, as they were unique and irreplaceable. So

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