Farr West, Utah

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Farr West is a city in Weber County, Utah, United States. The population was 3,094 at the 2000 census. It is part of the OgdenClearfield, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Geography

Farr West is located at 41°17′35″N 112°1′35″W / 41.29306°N 112.02639°W / 41.29306; -112.02639 (41.293143, -112.026489).[3]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.8 square miles (15.1 km²), all of it land.

Farr West is bordered by Plain City to the west, Willard to the north, Pleasant View to the north east, Harrisville to the east, and Marriott-Slaterville to the south.

History

Farr West City is located on the north end of Weber County. It is bordered on the east by Pleasant View and by Harrisville, on the south by Slaterville, and on the west by Plain City, and was first settled by Mormon pioneers. In 1858 Joseph Taylor settled in the area that later became Farr West. In 1868 the area was included as a part of Harrisville when a precinct was organized. On 30 November 1890 western Harrisville was organized into a separate LDS ward and given the name Farr West in honor of Lorin Farr, former president of the Weber LDS stake, and Chauncey W. West, who had served as presiding bishop of Weber County, and who was the son-in-law of Abraham Hoagland.[4]

The earliest settlers engaged in agriculture for their livelihood, and it received a great boost when the sugar beet industry was introduced in 1898. In 1923 further benefits were available to farmers when the Utah Packing Corporation installed a pea viner to help process field-grown peas.

Early settlers had to be quite self-sufficient. They primarily raised hay and grain and kept a few farm animals for work and for food. As the population grew, some farmers furnished milk and butter to customers in the city. Later, farmers branched into dairy or poultry operations to augment family income; a few raised cash crops like onions, tomatoes, and potatoes. Since World War II, most of the local small farms have gone out of business and only a few large farms specializing in dairy or beef production remain in operation. In the early 1990s, only one farm raised garden fruits and vegetables on a commercial basis. Irrigation for farming is still obtained through the western Irrigation Company Canal, constructed in 1858 and enlarged in 1884. The Willard Bay Canal, constructed through Farr West in 1965, may in time serve part of the community.

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