Fat acceptance movement

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The fat acceptance movement (also known as the size acceptance movement, fat liberation movement, and fat power) is a grassroots effort to change societal attitudes towards fat, obese, and overweight people.

Contents

Background

Activism concerning the societal acceptance of fat people covers numerous fronts but generally can be described as attempting to alter societal, internal, and medical attitudes.

The movement argues that overweight people are targets of hatred and discrimination,[1] and that obese women are subjected to more social pressure than obese men.[2][3][4] Hatred and disrespect towards fat people are seen in multiple places, including media outlets, where fat people are often ridiculed[5][6][7] or held up as objects of pity.[8] Discrimination comes in the form of lack of equal access to transportation and employment.[9]

Proponents argue that anti-fat stigma and aggressive diet promotion have led to an increase in psychological and physiological problems among fat people.[2] Proponents of fat acceptance maintain that people of all shapes and sizes can strive for fitness and physical health.[10][11][12][13] They believe health to be independent of, not dependent on, body weight. Thus, proponents promote "health at every size", the philosophy that one can pursue mental and physical health regardless of their physical appearance or size.

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