Fatty acid

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{disease, patient, cell}
{math, number, function}
{food, make, wine}

In chemistry, especially biochemistry, a fatty acid is a carboxylic acid with a long unbranched aliphatic tail (chain), which is either saturated or unsaturated. Most naturally occurring fatty acids have a chain of four to 28 carbons.[1] Fatty acids are usually derived from triglycerides or phospholipids. When they are not attached to other molecules, they are known as "free" fatty acids. Fatty acids are important sources of fuel because their metabolism yield large quantities of ATP. Many cell types can use either glucose or fatty acids for this purpose. In particular, heart and skeletal muscle prefer fatty acids. The brain cannot use fatty acids as a source of fuel; it relies on glucose or on ketone bodies.

Contents

Types of fatty acids

Fatty acids can be saturated and unsaturated, depending on double bonds. They differ in length as well.

Full article ▸

related documents
Zeolite
Lead
Cyanide
Nickel
Cell membrane
Polonium
Phosphorus
Mitochondrion
Lithium
DNA replication
Platinum
Fullerene
Arsenic
Thermite
Zinc
Coal
Lambda phage
Hafnium
Law of multiple proportions
Alkene
Chemical element
Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Cell wall
Selenium
Protein targeting
Bohrium
Catalysis
Fuel cell
Chromatin
Nitrous oxide