First aid

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{service, military, aircraft}
{law, state, case}
{group, member, jewish}
{@card@, make, design}
{company, market, business}
{school, student, university}
{church, century, christian}
{city, large, area}
{car, race, vehicle}
{day, year, event}
{war, force, army}

First aid is the provision of initial care for an illness or injury. It is usually performed by a non-expert person to a sick or injured person until definitive medical treatment can be accessed. Certain self-limiting illnesses or minor injuries may not require further medical care past the first aid intervention. It generally consists of a series of simple and in some cases, potentially life-saving techniques that an individual can be trained to perform with minimal equipment.

While first aid can also be performed on all animals, the term generally refers to care of human patients.

Contents

History

The instances of recorded first aid were provided by religious knights, such as the Knights Hospitaller, formed in the 11th century, providing care to pilgrims and knights, and training other knights in how to treat common battlefield injuries.[1] The practice of first aid fell largely in to disuse during the High Middle Ages, and organized societies were not seen again until in 1859 Henry Dunant organized local villagers to help victims of the Battle of Solferino, including the provision of first aid. Four years later, four nations met in Geneva and formed the organization which has grown into the Red Cross, with a key stated aim of "aid to sick and wounded soldiers in the field".[1] This was followed by the formation of St. John Ambulance in 1877, based on the principles of the Knights Hospitaller, to teach first aid, and numerous other organization joined them with the term first aid first coined in 1878 as civilian ambulance services spread as a combination of 'first treatment' and 'national aid'[1] in large railway centres and mining districts as well as with police forces. First aid training began to spread through the empire through organisations such as St John, often starting, as in the UK, with high risk activities such as ports and railways.[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Medical emergency
Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act
Fort Detrick
Nose-picking
Wart
Herd immunity
Rhinovirus
Shigella
Ulcerative colitis
Fallopian tube
Neurofibromatosis
Growth factor
Alpers' disease
Transient ischemic attack
Azotemia
Pneumonic plague
Tricyclic antidepressant
Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II
Mastectomy
Hemolysis
Rift Valley fever
Angioplasty
Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome
Mood stabilizer
Lithotriptor
Enterobiasis
Edema
Hyperglycemia
Human anatomy
Heart disease