Five Precepts

related topics
{god, call, give}
{woman, child, man}
{theory, work, human}
{day, year, event}
{law, state, case}
{church, century, christian}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{service, military, aircraft}
{school, student, university}

Five Precepts

The Five Precepts (Pali: pañca-sīlāni; Sanskrit: pañca-śīlāni)[1] constitute the basic Buddhist code of ethics, undertaken by lay followers (Upāsaka and Upāsikā) of the Buddha Gautama in the Theravada (practised mainly southeast and south Asia) and Mahayana (practised in China, Korea, and Japan) traditions. The Five Precepts are commitments to abstain from killing, stealing, sexual misconduct, lying and intoxication. Undertaking the five precepts is part of both lay Buddhist initiation and regular lay Buddhist devotional practices.

They are not formulated as imperatives, but as training rules that laypeople undertake voluntarily to facilitate practice.[2]

Contents

Pali texts

Pali literature provides the scriptures and commentary for traditional Theravadin practice.

Pali training rules

The following are the five precepts (pañca-sikkhāpada)[3] or five virtues (pañca-sīla) rendered in English and Pali:

Panathi patha veramaī sikkhāpada samādiyāmi.

Full article ▸

related documents
Religious prostitution
Pidyon HaBen
Taboo
Onan
Taniwha
Upanishad
Trimurti
Themis
Nut (goddess)
The Weirdstone of Brisingamen
Dis Pater
Giant (mythology)
Lleu Llaw Gyffes
Geryon
Tlaloc
Iris (mythology)
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God
Gideon (Bible)
Buto
Roman mythology
Seven Against Thebes
Agdistis
Hindu mythology
Leprechaun
Harpocrates
Endovelicus
Bharat Mata
Hecatonchires
Mímir
Sif