Frequency frogging

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{group, member, jewish}
{rate, high, increase}
{line, north, south}
{math, energy, light}

In telecommunication, the term frequency frogging has the following meanings:

1. The interchanging of the frequencies of carrier channels to accomplish specific purposes, such as to prevent feedback and oscillation, to reduce crosstalk, and to correct for a high frequency response slope in the transmission line.

Note: Frequency frogging is accomplished by having modulators, which are integrated into specially designed repeaters, translate a low-frequency group to a high-frequency group, and vice versa. A channel will appear in the low group for one repeater section and will then be translated to the high group for the next section because of frequency frogging. This results in nearly constant attenuation with frequency over two successive repeater sections, and eliminates the need for large slope equalization and adjustments. Singing and crosstalk are minimized because the high-level output of a repeater is at a different frequency than the low-level input to other repeaters. It also diminishes group delay distortion. A repeater that receives on the high band from both direction and sends on the low band is called Hi-Lo; the other kind Lo-Hi.

2. In microwave radio relay systems, the alternate use of two frequencies at repeater sites to prevent feedback and oscillation.

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from the General Services Administration document "Federal Standard 1037C" (in support of MIL-STD-188).

Full article ▸

related documents
32-bit
Jam signal
Shorten
NSAP address
Internet backbone
DECSYSTEM-20
Proxy ARP
MD Data
Microassembler
Call collision
PC-FX
Signal compression
3ivx
Preemphasis
Communications in Germany
Serial Line Internet Protocol
Uploading and downloading
National Information Infrastructure
Automated business process
Back Orifice
A3D
Horizontal blank interrupt
Hierarchical routing
Network architecture
Netscape Communicator
Inductive coupling
Bitstream
Automated information systems security
Telecommunications in Iceland
56 kbit/s line