Götterdämmerung

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Uncompleted Operas


About this sound Götterdämmerung (English: Twilight of the Gods)[1] is the last in Richard Wagner's cycle of four operas titled Der Ring des Nibelungen (English: The Ring of the Nibelung, or The Ring for short). It received its premiere at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus on 17 August 1876, as part of the first complete performance of the Ring.

The title is a translation into German of the Old Norse phrase Ragnarök, which in Norse mythology refers to a prophesied war of the gods that brings about the end of the world. However, as with the rest of the Ring, Wagner's account of this apocalypse diverges significantly from his Old Norse sources.

The term Götterdämmerung is occasionally used in English, referring to a disastrous conclusion of events.

Contents

Composition

Roles

Synopsis

Prologue

The three Norns, daughters of Erda, gather beside Brünnhilde's rock, weaving the rope of Destiny. They sing of the past and the present, and of the future when Wotan will set fire to Valhalla to signal the end of the gods. Without warning, their rope breaks. Lamenting the loss of their wisdom, the Norns disappear.

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