Gaul

related topics
{language, word, form}
{war, force, army}
{country, population, people}
{god, call, give}
{area, part, region}
{land, century, early}
{church, century, christian}
{government, party, election}
{mi², represent, 1st}

During the time of Ancient Rome, Gaul (Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe encompassing present day France, Luxembourg and Belgium, most of Switzerland, the western part of Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the left bank of the Rhine.

The Gauls were the speakers of the Gaulish language (an early variety of Celtic) native to Gaul. According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, the Gaulish language proper was distinct from the Aquitanian language and the Belgic language.[1] Archaeologically, the Gauls were bearers of the La Tène culture, which extended across all of Gaul, as well as east to Rhaetia, Noricum, Pannonia and southwestern Germania.

Gauls under Brennus defeated Roman forces in a battle circa 390 BC. The peak of Gaulish expansion was reached in the 3rd century BC, in the wake of the Gallic invasion of the Balkans of 281-279 BC, when Gaulish settlers moved as far afield as Asia Minor.[2]

During the 2nd and 1st centuries BC, Gaul fell under Roman rule: Gallia Cisalpina was conquered in 203 BC and Gallia Narbonensis in 123 BC. Gaul was invaded by the Cimbri and the Teutons after 120 BC, who were in turn defeated by the Romans by 101 BC. Julius Caesar finally subdued the remaining parts of Gaul in his campaigns of 58 to 51 BC. Roman control of Gaul lasted for five centuries, until the last Roman rump state, the Domain of Soissons, fell to the Franks in AD 486. During this time, the Celtic culture had become amalgamated into a Gallo-Roman culture and the Gaulish language was likely extinct by the 6th century.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Huns
Urartu
Bulgars
Sorbs
Sarmatians
Balts
Ceawlin of Wessex
Turan
Wends
Pomaks
Mongolian writing systems
Tāna
Wade-Giles
Mandarin Chinese
Number names
International Sign
W
Ruthenia
Cree language
Cedilla
Northern dynasties
Lower case
Plural
Yogh
Bislama
Elision
Grammar
Michif language
Verner's law
Austro-Bavarian