Genome

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Chromosome
DNA · RNA
Genome
Heredity
Mutation
Nucleotide
Variation

Glossary
Index
Outline

Introduction
History

Evolution · Molecular
Population genetics
Mendelian inheritance
Quantitative genetics
Molecular genetics

DNA sequencing
Genetic engineering
Genomics · Topics
Medical genetics

Branches in genetics

In modern molecular biology and genetics, the genome is the entirety of an organism's hereditary information. It is encoded either in DNA or, for many types of virus, in RNA. The genome includes both the genes and the non-coding sequences of the DNA.[1]

Contents

Origin of Term

The term was adapted in 1920 by Hans Winkler, Professor of Botany at the University of Hamburg, Germany. In Greek, the word genome (γίνομαι) means I become, I am born, to come into being. The Oxford English Dictionary suggests the name to be a blend of the words gene and chromosome. A few related -ome words already existed, such as biome and rhizome, forming a vocabulary into which genome fits systematically.[2]

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