Gill

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{acid, form, water}
{disease, patient, cell}
{water, park, boat}
{math, energy, light}
{@card@, make, design}

A gill is a respiratory organ found in many aquatic organisms that extracts dissolved oxygen from water, afterward excreting carbon dioxide. (It does not break up water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen to absorb oxygen.) The gills of some species such as hermit crabs have adapted to allow respiration on land provided they are kept moist. The microscopic structure of a gill presents a large surface area to the external environment.

Many microscopic aquatic animals, and some that are larger but inactive, can absorb adequate oxygen through the entire surface of their bodies, and so can respire adequately without a gill. However, more complex or more active aquatic organisms usually require a gill or gills.

Gills usually consist of thin filaments of tissue, branches, or slender tufted processes that have a highly folded surface to increase surface area. A high surface area is crucial to the gas exchange of aquatic organisms as water contains only 1/20 the dissolved oxygen that air does.

With the exception of some aquatic insects, the filaments and lamellae (folds) contain blood or coelomic fluid, from which gases are exchanged through the thin walls. The blood carries oxygen to other parts of the body. Carbon dioxide passes from the blood through the thin gill tissue into the water. Gills or gill-like organs, located in different parts of the body, are found in various groups of aquatic animals, including mollusks, crustaceans, insects, fish, and amphibians.

Contents

Invertebrate gills

Respiration in the Echinodermata (includes starfish and sea urchins) is carried out using a very primitive version of gills called papulae. These thin protuberances on the surface of the body contain diverticula of the water vascular system. Crustaceans, molluscs, and some insects have gills that are tufted or plate-like structures at the surface of the body.

The gills of other insects are tracheal, and also include both thin plates and tufted structures, and, in the larval dragon fly, the wall of the caudal end of the alimentary tract (rectum) is richly supplied with tracheae as a rectal gill. Water pumped into and out of the rectum provides oxygen to the closed tracheae. Aquatic insects use a tracheal gill, which contains air tubes. The oxygen in these tubes is renewed through the gills.

Full article ▸

related documents
Warm-blooded
Algae
Mycorrhiza
Genome
Insecticide
Metamorphosis
Bud
Anaconda
Mustelidae
Ciconiiformes
Kiwi
Porpoise
Cuscuta
Chupacabra
Pterodactylus
Monocotyledon
Burying beetle
Pollarding
Slime mold
Green Iguana
Euphorbia
Gibbon
Plant
Elm
Narwhal
Phoronid
Red Wolf
Abalone
Fig wasp
Australopithecus