Global Positioning System

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The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a space-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) that provides reliable location and time information in all weather and at all times and anywhere on or near the Earth when and where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites. It is maintained by the United States government and is freely accessible by anyone with a GPS receiver.

GPS was created and realized by the U.S. Department of Defense (USDOD) and was originally run with 24 satellites. It was established in 1973 to overcome the limitations of previous navigation systems.[1]

In addition to GPS other systems are in use or under development. The Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS) was for use by the Russian military only until 2007. There are also the planned Chinese Compass navigation system and Galileo positioning system of the European Union (EU).

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