Haddocks' Eyes

related topics
{god, call, give}
{food, make, wine}
{@card@, make, design}
{son, year, death}
{film, series, show}
{build, building, house}
{day, year, event}
{car, race, vehicle}

Haddocks' Eyes is a poem by Lewis Carroll from Through the Looking-Glass. It is sung by The White Knight in chapter eight to a tune that he claims as his own invention, but which Alice recognizes as I give thee all, I can no more.

By the time Alice heard it, she was already tired of poetry.

It is a parody of "Resolution and Independence" by William Wordsworth.

Contents

Naming

The White Knight explains a confusing nomenclature for the song.

  • The song's name is called Haddocks' Eyes
  • The song's name really is The Aged Aged Man
  • The song is called Ways and Means
  • The song really is A-sitting On a Gate

This complicated terminology entails the use–mention distinction.[citation needed]

The Poem

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

Upon the Lonely Moor

Like "Jabberwocky," another poem published in Through the Looking Glass, "Haddocks’ Eyes" appears to have been revised over the course of many years. In 1856, Carroll published the following poem anonymously under the name Upon the Lonely Moor. It bears an obvious resemblance to "Haddocks' Eyes."

See also

References

Full article ▸

related documents
Jiang Shi
Moctezuma I
Ahmad ibn Fadlan
Aeëtes
Seth
Sheba
Noldor
Philomela (princess of Athens)
Eriphyle
Manco Cápac
Iphigeneia
Silenus
Cecrops I
Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors
Min (god)
Fand
Amrita
Hymenaios
Proserpina
Plutus
Amphion and Zethus
The High Priestess
Dryas
Nereus
Bacchylides
Archilochus
Orestes (mythology)
Harmonia (mythology)
Dellingr
Jörmungandr