Hedonism

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{god, call, give}
{son, year, death}
{language, word, form}
{rate, high, increase}

Hedonism is a school which argues that pleasure is the only intrinsic good.[1] This is often used as a justification for evaluating actions in terms of how much pleasure and how little pain (i.e. suffering) they produce. In very simple terms, a hedonist strives to maximize this net pleasure (pleasure minus pain).

Contents

Etymology

The name derives from the Greek word for "delight" (ἡδονισμός hēdonismos from ἡδονή hēdonē "pleasure", a cognate of English sweet + suffix -ισμός -ismos "ism").

Classic schools of antiquity

Democritus seems to be the earliest philosopher on record to have categorically embraced a hedonistic philosophy; he called the supreme goal of life "contentment" or "cheerfulness", claiming that "joy and sorrow are the distinguishing mark of things beneficial and harmful" (DK 68 B 188).[2]

Cārvāka

Cārvāka was an Indian hedonist school of thought that arose approximately about 600 BCE, and died out in the 14th century CE. The Cārvākas maintained that the Hindu scriptures are false, that the priests are liars, and that there is no afterlife, and that pleasure should be the aim of living. Unlike other Indian schools of philosophy, the Cārvākas argued that there is nothing wrong with sensual indulgence. They held a naturalistic worldview.

Full article ▸

related documents
Ralph Cudworth
Thought
Cargo cult science
Internalization
Discovery (observation)
Pyrrho
Being
Simile
Deductive reasoning
Hierarchy
Samuel Bailey
Ethnomusicology
Biostatistics
Observation
Integrity
Great man theory
Bias
Baconian method
Ethnology
Augusto Boal
Artificial life
Cognitive linguistics
Four Temperaments
Cosmos
Classical unities
Bounded rationality
False dilemma
Principle (disambiguation)
Magic realism
Allegory