Hepburn romanization

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The Hepburn romanization system (ヘボン式ローマ字 Hebon-shiki Rōmaji?) is named after James Curtis Hepburn, who used it to transcribe the sounds of the Japanese language into the Latin alphabet in the third edition of his Japanese–English dictionary, published in 1887. The system was originally proposed by the Society for the Romanization of the Japanese Alphabet (羅馬字会 Rōmajikai) in 1885. The Hepburn system was subsequently revised and called Hyōjun-shiki Rōmaji (標準式ローマ字) (standard style) in 1908.[1][2] Incidentally, Hyōjun-shiki Rōmaji often refers the original proposal by the Rōmajikai in 1885 or Hepburn's dictionary.[3][4]

The original and revised variants of Hepburn remain the most widely used methods of transcription of Japanese. As Hepburn is based on English phonology, an English speaker unfamiliar with Japanese will generally pronounce a word romanized in Hepburn more accurately than a word romanized in the competing Kunrei-shiki.

Kanji

Kana

Uses

Rōmaji

Punctuation

Contents

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