Heterochromatin

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Heterochromatin is a tightly packed form of DNA, which comes in different varieties. These varieties lie on a continuum between the two extremes of constitutive and facultative heterochromatin. Both play a role in the expression of genes, where constitutive heterochromatin can affect the genes near them (position-effect variegation) and where facultative heterochromatin is the result of genes that are silenced through a mechanism such as histone methylation or siRNA through RNAi. Constitutive heterochromatin is usually repetitive and forms structural functions such as centromeres or telomeres, in addition to acting as an attractor for other gene-expression or repression signals. Facultative heterochromatin is not repetitive and although it shares the compact structure of constitutive heterochromatin, facultative heterochromatin can, under specific developmental or environmental signaling cues, lose its condensed structure and become transcriptionally active.[1] Heterochromatin is often associated with the di and tri-methylation of H3K9.[2]

Contents

Structure

Chromatin is found in two varieties: euchromatin and heterochromatin.[3] Originally, the two forms were distinguished cytologically by how intensely they stained - the euchromatin is less intense, while heterochromatin stains intensely, indicating tighter packing. Heterochromatin is usually localized to the periphery of the nucleus.

Heterochromatin mainly consists of genetically inactive satellite sequences,[4] and many genes are repressed to various extents, although some cannot be expressed in euchromatin at all.[5] Both centromeres and telomeres are heterochromatic, as is the Barr body of the second, inactivated X chromosome in a female.

Function

Heterochromatin has been associated with several functions, from gene regulation to the protection of the integrity of chromosomes;[6] some of these roles can be attributed to the dense packing of DNA, which makes it less accessible to protein factors that usually bind DNA or its associated factors. For example, naked double-stranded DNA ends would usually be interpreted by the cell as damaged or viral DNA, triggering cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, or destruction of the DNA fragment such as by endonucleases in bacteria.

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