Holography

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{album, band, music}
{film, series, show}
{work, book, publish}
{company, market, business}
{acid, form, water}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{area, community, home}
{car, race, vehicle}
{ship, engine, design}

Holography (from the Greek, ὅλος hólos whole + γραφή grafē writing, drawing) is a technique that allows the light scattered from an object to be recorded and later reconstructed so that it appears as if the object is in the same position relative to the recording medium as it was when recorded. The image changes as the position and orientation of the viewing system changes in exactly the same way as if the object were still present, thus making the recorded image (hologram) appear three dimensional.

The technique of holography can also be used to optically store, retrieve, and process information. While it has been possible to create a 3-D holographic picture of a static object since the 1960s, it is only in the last few years[when?] that arbitrary scenes or videos can be shown on a holographic volumetric display.[1][2]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Astronomy
Speed of light
Physical cosmology
Planet
Cosmic inflation
Light
Faster-than-light
Bohr model
Entropy
Luminiferous aether
Vega
Cygnus X-1
Double-slit experiment
Quantum field theory
Surface tension
Uncertainty principle
Loop quantum gravity
X-ray crystallography
Momentum
Time travel
Aurora (astronomy)
Photon
Andromeda Galaxy
Neutrino
Stellar classification
Open cluster
Orbit
Lightning
Specific heat capacity
Binary star