Hugo von Hofmannsthal

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{son, year, death}
{film, series, show}
{church, century, christian}
{album, band, music}
{language, word, form}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{work, book, publish}
{@card@, make, design}

Hugo Laurenz August Hofmann von Hofmannsthal (1 February 1874 – 15 July 1929), was an Austrian novelist, librettist, poet, dramatist, narrator, and essayist.

Contents

Early life

Hofmannsthal was born in Landstraße, Vienna, the son of an upper-class Austrian mother, Anna Maria Josefa Fohleutner (1852–1904), and an Austrian–Italian bank manager, Hugo August Peter Hofmann, Edler von Hofmannsthal (1841–1915). His great-grandfather, Isaak Löw Hofmann, Edler von Hofmannsthal, from whom his family inherited the noble title "Edler von Hofmannsthal," was a Jewish merchant ennobled by the Austrian emperor. He began to write poems and plays from an early age. He met the German poet Stefan George at the age of seventeen and had several poems published in George's journal, Blätter für die Kunst. He studied law and later philology in Vienna but decided to devote himself to writing upon graduating in 1901. Along with Peter Altenberg and Arthur Schnitzler, he was a member of the avant garde group Young Vienna (Jung Wien).

Career

In 1900, Hofmannsthal met the composer Richard Strauss for the first time. He later wrote libretti for several of his operas, including Elektra (1909), Der Rosenkavalier (1911), Ariadne auf Naxos (1912, rev. 1916), Die Frau ohne Schatten (1919), Die ägyptische Helena (1927), and Arabella (1933).

In 1912 he adapted the 15th century English morality play Everyman as Jedermann, and Jean Sibelius (amongst others) wrote incidental music for it. The play later became a staple at the Salzburg Festival.

During the First World War Hofmannsthal held a government post. He wrote speeches and articles supporting the war effort, and emphasizing the cultural tradition of Austria-Hungary. The end of the war spelled the end of the old monarchy in Austria; this was a blow from which the patriotic and conservative-minded Hofmannsthal never fully recovered.

Full article ▸

related documents
Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan
Hippias
Frederic William Henry Myers
Robert M. Pirsig
Rat Man
William Wollaston
Augustus Pitt Rivers
Phineas Quimby
Autobiographical novel
Trial of Socrates
Ammonius Saccas
George Inness
Mikhail Saltykov-Shchedrin
Olaf Stapledon
Francisco Varela
André Breton
Mahātmā
Peter Kropotkin
The Languages of Pao
Karel Čapek
Emic and etic
Damned knowledge
Harold Lasswell
David Gauthier
Marxist literary criticism
Thoughtcrime
Moral universalism
Chrysippus
Neo-Darwinism
Inverse gambler's fallacy