Icosidodecahedron

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{area, part, region}
{math, number, function}

In geometry, an icosidodecahedron is a polyhedron with twenty triangular faces and twelve pentagonal faces. An icosidodecahedron has 30 identical vertices, with two triangles and two pentagons meeting at each, and 60 identical edges, each separating a triangle from a pentagon. As such it is one of the Archimedean solids and more particularly, a quasiregular polyhedron.

An icosidodecahedron has icosahedral symmetry, and its first stellation is the compound of a dodecahedron and its dual icosahedron, with the vertices of the icosahedron located at the midpoints of the edges of either. Convenient Cartesian coordinates for the vertices of an icosidodecahedron with unit edges are given by the cyclic permutations of (0,0,±τ), (±1/2, ±τ/2, ±(1+τ)/2), where τ is the golden ratio, (1+√5)/2. Its dual polyhedron is the rhombic triacontahedron. An icosidodecahedron can be split along any of six planes to form a pair of pentagonal rotundae, which belong among the Johnson solids.

In the standard nomenclature used for the Johnson solids, an icosidodecahedron would be called a pentagonal gyrobirotunda.

Contents

Area and volume

The area A and the volume V of the icosidodecahedron of edge length a are:

Related polyhedra

The icosidodecahedron is a rectified dodecahedron and also a rectified icosahedron, existing as the full-edge truncation between these regular solids.

The Icosidodecahedron contains 12 pentagons of the dodecahedron and 20 triangles of the icosahedron:

It is also related to the Johnson solid called a pentagonal orthobirotunda created by two pentagonal rotunda connected as mirror images.

Eight uniform star polyhedra share the same vertex arrangement. Of these, two also share the same edge arrangement: the small icosihemidodecahedron (having the triangular faces in common), and the small dodecahemidodecahedron (having the pentagonal faces in common). The vertex arrangement is also shared with the compounds of five octahedra and of five tetrahemihexahedra.

Full article ▸

related documents
Kirkwood gap
Galactic coordinate system
Equuleus
Spica
Quintessence (physics)
Rayleigh number
Alpha Arietis
Equatorial coordinate system
Coulomb
Groups of minor planets
Altair
Prandtl number
C-symmetry
Triangulum
Atom probe
Hour angle
Directive gain
Quantum leap
Canes Venatici
Guided ray
Libra (constellation)
Microphotonics
Édouard Roche
Brightness temperature
Luna 14
Thermosphere
Umbra
Truncated icosahedron
Archimedean spiral
Laminar flow