Igbo mythology

related topics
{god, call, give}
{law, state, case}
{son, year, death}
{woman, child, man}
{household, population, female}
{language, word, form}

God Almighty
Chukwu

Divinities (Alusi)
Ahia Njoku | Ogbunabali | Njoku Ji
Ala | Ikenga
Amadioha | Alusi

Legendary Creatures & Concepts
Anyanwu | Ekwensu
Agbala | Mmuo

Legendary Figures
Ogbanje | Adamma (masquerade)
Ezenwanyi | Mmanwu | Eri

Topics
Chi | Ekpe | Enigwe
Kpakpando | Inouwa
Osu caste system

Sacred Places
Arochukwu | Onitsha | Nri-Igbo

Derivatives
Obeah | Jonkonnu

Ọdinani, also Ọdinala, Omenala,Omenana, Odinana or Ọmenani is the traditional cultural beliefs and practises of the Igbo people[1] of West Africa. These terms, as used here in the Igbo language, are synonymous with the traditional Igbo "religious system" which was not considered separate from the social norms of ancient or traditional Igbo societies. Theocentric in nature, spirituality played a huge role in their everyday lives. Although it has largely been supplanted by Christianity, the indigenous belief system remains in strong effect among the rural and village populations of the Igbo, where it has at times influenced the colonial religions. Odinani is a panentheistic faith, having a strong central deity at its head. All things spring from this deity. Although a semi-pantheon exists in the belief system, as it does in many indigenous African and Eastern religions, the lesser deities prevalent in Odinani expressly serve as elements of Chukwu the central deity.[2]

Like all religions, Odinani is the vehicle used by its practitioners to understand their World (called "Uwa"), or more specifically, the part of the World that affects them — which is to say the dry Land on which the Igbo live and gather sustenance — and it is from this that the belief acquires its names: "Ọ di" (Igbo: it is ) + n'(na - Igbo: on/within) + "Ani" (Igbo: the Land or the Earth goddess) in the Northern Igbo dialects and also "O me" (Igbo: it happens ) + n'(na - Igbo: on/within) + "Ala" (Igbo: the Land or the physical manifestation of the Earth goddess as dry land) as used primarily in the Southern Igbo dialects.[3] Chukwu, as the central deity and driving force in the cosmos is unknowable, and too great of a power to be approached directly save by the manifestations that exist on the World (the Land, the Skies, and the Sea). Thus, Odinani rarely deals directly with the force that is Chukwu. Many other spirits and forces also exist in Odinani belief and folklore.[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Ptah
Wepwawet
Asclepius
Actaeon
Veiovis
Vayu
Thriae
Itzamna
Wizard (Middle-earth)
Gigantes
Abracadabra
Badb
Geb
Osiris-Dionysus
Sothis
Orcus
Epimenides
Khoikhoi mythology
Aaron
Bes
Vasu
Sobek
Tithonus
Aos Sí
Vamana
Coatlicue
Deianira
Rakshasa
Samuel (Bible)
Mammon