Jana Gana Mana

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Jana Gana Mana (Bengali: জন গণ মন, Jôno Gôno Mono) is the national anthem of India. Originally written in highly Sanskritized (Tatsama) Bengali, it is the first of five stanzas of a Brahmo hymn composed and scored by Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore. It was first sung at the Calcutta Session of the Indian National Congress on 27 December 1911.

The original poem written by Rabinder Nath Tagore was translated into Hindi by Abid Ali. The original hindi version of the song Jana Gana Mana, translated by Ali and based on the poem by Tagore, was a little different. It was "Sukh Chain Ki Barkha Barase, Bharat Bhagya Hai Jaga....". The music for the present National Anthem was composed by Captain Ram Singh Thakur of the Subhash Chandra Bose led Indian National Army, as Qaumi Tarana of the INA at Singapore in 1943. Jana Gana Mana was officially adopted by the Constituent Assembly as the Indian national anthem on January 24, 1950.[1][2][3] [4][5][6][7]

A formal rendition of the national anthem takes fifty-two seconds. A shortened version consisting of the first and last lines (and taking about 20 seconds to play) is also staged occasionally.[1] Tagore wrote down the English translation of the song and along with Margaret Cousins (an expert in European music and wife of Irish poet James Cousins), set down the notation which is followed till this day.[8] It is of interest that another poem by Tagore (Amar Shonar Bangla) is the national anthem of Bangladesh.

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Lyrics

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