John Kenneth Galbraith

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John Kenneth "Ken" Galbraith (properly pronounced /ɡælˈbreɪθ/ gal-BRAYTH, but commonly pronounced /ˈɡælbreɪθ/GAL-brayth), (October 15, 1908 – April 29, 2006) was a Canadian-American economist. He was a Keynesian and an institutionalist, a leading proponent of 20th-century political liberalism. His books on economic topics were bestsellers from the 1950s through the 2000s and he filled the role of public intellectual from the 50's to the 1970s on matters of economics.

Galbraith was a prolific author who produced four dozen books and over a thousand articles on various subjects. Among his most famous works was a popular trilogy on economics, American Capitalism (1952), The Affluent Society (1958), and The New Industrial State (1967). He taught at Harvard University for many years. Galbraith was active in Democratic Party politics, serving in the administrations of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson; he served as United States Ambassador to India under Kennedy. Due to his prodigious literary output he was arguably the best known economist in the world during his lifetime[1] and was one of a select few people to be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom twice, in 1946 and 2000, for services to economics.

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