Journaling file system

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{math, number, function}
{work, book, publish}
{law, state, case}
{car, race, vehicle}

A journaling file system is a file system that keeps track of the changes that will be made in a journal (usually a circular log in a dedicated area of the file system) before committing them to the main file system. In the event of a system crash or power failure, such file systems are quicker to bring back online and less likely to become corrupted.[1]

Contents

Rationale

Updating file systems to reflect changes to files and directories usually requires many separate write operations. This makes it possible for an interruption (like a power failure or system crash) between writes to leave data structures in an invalid intermediate state.[1]

For example, deleting a file on a Unix file system involves two steps:

If a crash occurs between steps 1 and 2, there will be an orphaned inode and hence a storage leak. On the other hand, if only step 2 is performed first before the crash, the not-yet-deleted file will be marked free and possibly be overwritten by something else.

In a non-journaled file system, detecting and recovering from such inconsistencies requires a complete walk of its data structures. This must typically be done before the file system is next mounted for read-write access. If the file system is large and if there is relatively little I/O bandwidth, this can take a long time and result in longer downtimes if it blocks the rest of the system from coming back online.

To prevent this, a journaled file system allocates a special area—the journal—in which it records the changes it will make, ahead of time. After a crash, recovery simply involves reading the journal from the file system and replaying changes from this journal until the file system is consistent again. The changes are thus said to be atomic (or indivisible) in that they either:

  • succeed (have succeeded originally or be replayed completely during recovery), or
  • are not replayed at all (are skipped because they had not yet been completely written to the journal).

Techniques

Some file systems allow the journal to grow, shrink and be re-allocated just as a regular file, while others put the journal in a contiguous area or a hidden file that is guaranteed not to move or change size while the file system is mounted. Some file systems may also allow external journals on a separate device, such as a solid-state disk or battery-backed non-volatile RAM. Changes to the journal may themselves be journaled for additional redundancy, or the journal may be distributed across multiple physical volumes to protect against device failure.

Full article ▸

related documents
Vim (text editor)
MMX (instruction set)
Object Linking and Embedding
Liberty BASIC
Mozilla
Multicast address
Complex instruction set computer
NeWS
XUL
UCSD Pascal
Lotus 1-2-3
First-generation programming language
Alpha compositing
IA-32
Machine code
PDP-11
ACID
International Mobile Subscriber Identity
Troff
NewtonScript
LaTeX
Parallel algorithm
Web browser
Talker
Direct-sequence spread spectrum
JFS (file system)
Lotus Symphony
Streaming SIMD Extensions
Web service
Μ-law algorithm