Juggernaut

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A juggernaut (About this sound American pronunciation ) is a term used in the English language to describe a literal or metaphorical force regarded as unstoppable.

It is often applied to a large machine, or collectively to a team or group of people working together, or even a growing political movement led by a charismatic leader—and it often bears an association with being crushingly destructive.

Juggernaut is also a modern-day gaming term for describing characters with the status of high health.[citation needed]

Etymology

The word is derived from the Sanskrit जगन्नाथ Jagannātha[1] (meaning "Lord of the Universe"), which is one of the many names of Krishna from the ancient Vedic scriptures of India.

One of the most famous of Indian temples is the Jagannath Temple in Puri, Orissa, which has the Ratha Yatra ("chariot procession"), an annual procession of chariots carrying the murtis (statues) of Jagannâth (Krishna), Subhadra and Balabhadra (Krishna's elder brother).

A popular 14th-century work, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, apocryphally[2] describes Hindus, as a religious sacrifice, casting themselves under the wheels of these huge chariots and being crushed to death.

Based on this claim, British colonials[3] promulgated the claim that Hindu devotees of Krishna were "lunatic fanatics who threw themselves under the wheels of these chariots in order to attain salvation". Others have suggested more prosaically that the deaths, if any, were accidental and caused by the press of the crowd and the general commotion.[4]

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