Jury

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{theory, work, human}
{government, party, election}
{area, community, home}
{church, century, christian}
{son, year, death}
{@card@, make, design}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{mi², represent, 1st}
{day, year, event}
{borough, population, unit_pref}
{village, small, smallsup}

A jury is a sworn body of people convened to render an impartial verdict (a finding of fact on a question) officially submitted to them by a court, or to set a penalty or judgment. Modern juries tend to be found in courts to judge whether an accused person is not guilty or guilty of a crime. (There is no such verdict as "innocent").

A person who is serving on a jury is a "juror".

The old institution of Grand Juries, which are now rare, still exist in some places, particularly the United States, to investigate whether enough evidence of a crime exists to bring someone to trial.

The jury arrangement has evolved out of the earliest juries, which were found in early medieval England. Members were supposed to inform themselves of crimes and then of the details of the crimes. Their function was therefore closer to that of a grand jury than that of a jury in a trial.

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