Kaddish

related topics
{god, call, give}
{group, member, jewish}
{language, word, form}
{church, century, christian}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{album, band, music}
{day, year, event}
{line, north, south}

Kaddish (קדיש, Qaddish Aramaic: "holy"; alternate spelling, qaddish) is a prayer found in the Jewish prayer service. The central theme of the Kaddish is the magnification and sanctification of God's name. In the liturgy different versions of the Kaddish are used functionally as separators between sections of the service. The term "Kaddish" is often used to refer specifically to "The Mourners' Kaddish", said as part of the mourning rituals in Judaism in all prayer services as well as at funerals and memorials. When mention is made of "saying Kaddish", this unambiguously denotes the rituals of mourning.

The opening words of this prayer are inspired by Ezekiel 38:23, a vision of God becoming great in the eyes of all the nations. The central line of the Kaddish in Jewish tradition is the congregation's response: יְהֵא שְׁמֵהּ רַבָּא מְבָרַךְ לְעָלַם וּלְעָלְמֵי עָלְמַיָּא (Yehei shmëh rabba mevarakh lealam ulalmey almaya, "May His great name be blessed for ever, and to all eternity"), a public declaration of God's greatness and eternality.[1] This response is an Aramaic translation of the Hebrew "ברוך שם כבוד מלכותו לעולם ועד" (Blessed be the name of His glorious kingdom for ever and ever), which is to be found in the Jerusalem Targum (יְהֵא שְׁמֵיהּ רַבָּא מְבָרֵךְ לְעָלְמֵי עַלְמִין) (Genesis 49:2 and Deuteronomy 6:4, and is similar to the wording of Daniel 2:20.

The Mourner's, Rabbis' and Complete Kaddish end with a supplication for peace ("Oseh Shalom..."), which is in Hebrew, and comes from the Bible Job 25:1.

Along with the Shema and Amidah, the Kaddish is one of the most important and central prayers in the Jewish liturgy.

Contents

History and background

"The Kaddish is in origin a closing doxology to an Aggadic discourse".[2] Most of it is written in Aramaic, which, at the time of its original composition, was the lingua franca of the Jewish people. It is not composed in the vernacular Aramaic, however, but rather in a "literary, jargon Aramaic" that was used in the academies, and is identical to the dialect of the Targum.[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Mormon
Mouride
Marabout
Tenrikyo
Samaritan Pentateuch
Muslim
Mabinogion
Prose Edda
Ode
Jana Gana Mana
Ahasuerus
Poetic Edda
Merovech
Black Speech
Dievas
List of Latin words with English derivatives
Qibla al-Qudsiyya
Tripiṭaka
Sopdu
Coven
Auðumbla
Midgard
Cave of the Patriarchs
Hebrews
Pange Lingua Gloriosi Corporis Mysterium
Menorah (Temple)
Tatian
Third Epistle of John
Matthew the Evangelist
Zacchaeus