Ketone

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In organic chemistry, a ketone (pronounced /ˈkiːtoʊn/) is a compound with the structure RC(=O)R', where R and R' can be a variety of atoms and groups of atoms. It features a carbonyl group (C=O) bonded to two other carbon atoms.[1] Acetone is the simplest example of a ketone, and in fact the word ketone derives its name from Aketon, an old German word for acetone.[2]

Ketones differ from aldehydes in that the carbonyl is placed between two carbons rather than at the end of a carbon skeleton. They are also distinct from other functional groups, such as carboxylic acids, esters and amides, which have a carbonyl group bonded to a hetero atom.

A ketone that has an α-hydrogen participates in a so-called keto-enol tautomerism. The reaction with a strong base gives the corresponding enolate, often by deprotonation of the enol.

Contents

Nomenclature

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