Kirlian photography

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{@card@, make, design}
{work, book, publish}
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{film, series, show}
{system, computer, user}
{school, student, university}

Kirlian photography refers to a form of photogram made with voltage. It is named after Semyon Kirlian, who in 1939 accidentally discovered that if an object on a photographic plate is connected to a source of voltage an image is produced on the photographic plate.[1]

Kirlian's work, from 1939 onward, involved an independent rediscovery of a phenomenon and technique variously called "electrography", "electrophotography" and "corona discharge photography." The Kirlian technique is contact photography, in which the subject is in direct contact with a film placed upon a charged metal plate.

The underlying physics (which makes xerographic copying possible) was explored as early as 1777 by Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (see Lichtenberg figures). Later workers in the field included Nikola Tesla; various other individuals explored the effect in the later 19th and early 20th centuries.

Kirlian said that the image he was studying might be compared with the human aura. An experiment in evidence of energy fields generated by living entities involves taking Kirlian contact photographs of a picked leaf at set periods, its gradual withering corresponding with a decline in the strength of the aura. In some experiments, if a section of a leaf was torn away after the first photograph, a faint image of the missing section would remain when a second photograph was taken. The Archives of American Art Journal of the Smithsonian Institution published a leading article with reproductions of images of this phenomenon.[specify] James Randi has suggested that this effect was due to contamination of the glass plates, which were reused for both the "before" and "after" photographs.[2]

Contents

Research

In addition to living material, inanimate objects such as coins will also produce images on the film in a Kirlian photograph setup. In the United States, Dr. Thelma Moss of UCLA devoted much time and energy to the study of Kirlian photography when she led the parapsychology laboratory there in the 1970s. [3]

Also, in the 1970s psychologist Joe H. Slate Ph.D. led research at Athens State University under the United States Army Aviation and Missile Command as project "Kirlian Photography" (Featured in the History Channel's Vampire Secrets).

Full article ▸

related documents
Janez Strnad
Pentagon
Faraday cage
Rhombicuboctahedron
Gouraud shading
Orrery
Coil
Tin foil hat
Orbital (The Culture)
Truncated icosahedron
Cutback technique
Non-Newtonian fluid
Thread (Pern)
Triboelectric effect
Archimedean spiral
Drop (liquid)
Iapetus (moon)
M. C. Escher
Atlas (moon)
Tractor beam
Julius Plücker
Angular acceleration
Antenna effective area
Electro-optic effect
Rheology
Spheroid
Atomic, molecular, and optical physics
North Star
Haidinger's brush
Albireo