Lead

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{@card@, make, design}
{disease, patient, cell}
{food, make, wine}
{work, book, publish}
{rate, high, increase}
{son, year, death}
{ship, engine, design}
{woman, child, man}
{math, energy, light}
{line, north, south}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

Lead (play /ˈlɛd/) is a main-group element with symbol Pb (Latin: plumbum) and atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, malleable poor metal. It is also counted as one of the heavy metals. Metallic lead has a bluish-white color after being freshly cut, but it soon tarnishes to a dull grayish color when exposed to air. Lead has a shiny chrome-silver luster when it is melted into a liquid.

Lead is used in building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets and shots, weights, as part of solders, pewters, fusible alloys and as a radiation shield. Lead has the highest atomic number of all of the stable elements, although the next higher element, bismuth, has a half-life that is so long (much longer than the age of the universe) that it can be considered stable. Its four stable isotopes have 82 protons, a "magic number" in the nuclear shell model of atomic nuclei.

Lead is a poisonous substance to animals. It damages the nervous system and causes brain disorders. Excessive lead also causes blood disorders in mammals. Like the element mercury, another heavy metal, lead is a potent neurotoxin that accumulates both in soft tissues and the bones. Lead poisoning has been documented from ancient Rome, ancient Greece, and ancient China.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Fatty acid
Zeolite
Cyanide
Nickel
Polonium
Phosphorus
Cell membrane
Lithium
DNA replication
Mitochondrion
Platinum
Fullerene
Zinc
Thermite
Hafnium
Arsenic
Coal
Law of multiple proportions
Alkene
Lambda phage
Cell wall
Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Chemical element
Bohrium
Catalysis
Selenium
Protein targeting
Palladium
Fuel cell
Nitrous oxide