Lisp machine

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Lisp machines were general-purpose computers designed (usually through hardware support) to efficiently run Lisp as their main software language. In a sense, they were the first commercial single-user workstations. Despite being modest in number (perhaps 7,000 units total as of 1988[1]), Lisp machines commercially pioneered many now-commonplace technologies — including effective garbage collection, laser printing, windowing systems, computer mice, high-resolution bit-mapped graphics, computer graphic rendering, and networking innovations like CHAOSNet. Several companies were building and selling Lisp Machines in the 1980s: Symbolics (3600, 3640, XL1200, MacIvory and other models), Lisp Machines Incorporated (LMI Lambda), Texas Instruments (Explorer and MicroExplorer) and Xerox (InterLisp-D workstations). The operating systems were written in Lisp Machine Lisp, InterLisp (Xerox) and later partly in Common Lisp.

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