Magnavox Odyssey²

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{game, team, player}
{album, band, music}
{area, community, home}
{math, number, function}
{black, white, people}

The Magnavox Odyssey², known in Europe as the Philips Videopac G7000, in Brazil as the Philips Odyssey, in the United States as the Magnavox Odyssey² and the Philips Odyssey², and also by many other names, is a video game console released in 1978.

In the early 1970s, Magnavox was an innovator in the home video game industry. They succeeded in bringing the first home video game system to market, the Odyssey, which was quickly followed by a number of later models, each with a few technological improvements. In 1978, Magnavox, now a subsidiary of North American Philips, released the Odyssey², its new second-generation video game console.

In 2009, the video game website IGN named the Odyssey² the 21st greatest video game console, out of its list of 25.[2]

Contents

Design

The original Odyssey had a number of removable circuit cards that switched between the built-in games, of which there were ten in Europe and Asia, and twelve in America. The Odyssey² followed in the steps of the Fairchild Channel F and Atari 2600 by being designed to play programmable ROM cartridges. With this improvement, each game could be a completely unique experience, with its own background graphics, foreground graphics, gameplay, scoring, and music. The potential was enormous, as an unlimited number of games could be individually purchased; a game player could purchase a library of video games tailored to his or her own interest. Unlike any other system at that time, the Odyssey² included a full alphanumeric membrane keyboard, which was to be used for educational games, selecting options, or programming (Magnavox released a cartridge called Computer Intro! with the intent of teaching simple computer programming).

The Odyssey² used the standard joystick design of the 1970s and early 1980s: the original console had a moderately-sized silver controller, held in one hand, with a square housing for its eight-direction stick that was manipulated with the other hand. Later releases had a similar black controller, with an 8-pointed star-shaped housing for its eight-direction joystick. In the upper corner of the joystick was a single 'Action' button, silver on the original controllers and red on the black controllers. The games, graphics and packaging were designed by Ron Bradford and Steve Lehner.[3]

Full article ▸

related documents
Internetwork Packet Exchange
Data circuit-terminating equipment
Standard-definition television
Unicos
VSE (operating system)
Colorburst
VESA Local Bus
InterMezzo (file system)
MP/M
Chaosnet
GE-200 series
ISO 7816
Motorola 88000
Links (web browser)
Hyper-threading
Linux framebuffer
IBM PC keyboard
Red Book (audio CD standard)
FastTrack
Skinny Call Control Protocol
Terminal adapter
32-bit application
Transform coding
Unijunction transistor
Z/OS
Primary rate interface
Local loop
Nascom
8-bit
EEPROM