Malvasia

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{country, population, people}
{land, century, early}
{theory, work, human}
{church, century, christian}
{god, call, give}
{language, word, form}
{mi², represent, 1st}

Malvasia [malvaˈziːa] (also known as Malvazia) is a group of wine grape varieties grown historically in the Mediterranean region, Balearic islands, Canary Islands and the island of Madeira, but now grown in many of the winemaking regions of the world. In the past, the names Malvasia, Malvazia, and Malmsey have been used interchangeably for Malvasia-based wines; however, in modern oenology, "Malmsey" is now used almost exclusively for a sweet variety of Madeira wine made from the Malvasia grape. Grape varieties in this family include Malvasia Bianca, Malvasia di Schierano, Malvasia Negra, Malvasia Nera Malvasia Nera di Brindisi and a number of other varieties.[1]

Malvasia wines are produced in Italy (including Lombardia, Sicily, Lipari, and Sardinia), Slovenia, Croatia, Corsica, the Iberian Peninsula, the Canary Islands, the island of Madeira, California, Arizona, Australia and Brazil. These grapes are used to produce white (and more rarely red) table wines, dessert wines, and fortified wines of the same name, or are sometimes used as part of a blend of grapes, such as in Vin Santo.

Contents

History

Most ampelographers believe that the Malvasia family of grapes are of ancient origin, most likely originating in Greece.[2] The name "Malvasia" is generally thought to derive from Monemvasia, a Venetian fortress on the coast of Laconia, known in Italian as "Malvasia"; this port would have acted as a trading center for wine produced in the eastern Peloponnese and perhaps in some of the Cyclades. During the Middle Ages, the Venetians would become so prolific in the trading of "Malvasia wine" that merchant wine shops in Venice were known as malvasie.[2] A competing theory holds that the name is derived from the district of Malevizi, near the city of Heraklion (known to the Venetians as Candia) on Crete.[3][4] In any case, Malmsey was one of the three major wines exported from Greece in medieval times. (For other examples, see Rumney wine and Cretan wine).

Full article ▸

related documents
Chop suey
Paella
Cocktail
Tonkatsu
Millet
Pie
Malt
Chocolate bar
Baking
Hunan cuisine
Neapolitan ice cream
Bovril
Edamame
Aioli
Tostada
Submarine sandwich
Manhattan (cocktail)
Chiuchow cuisine
Chocolate chip cookie
Perry
Peanut butter and jelly sandwich
Drink
Ambergris
Caribbean cuisine
Drupe
Bentō
Starch
Trifle
Seasoning
Kvass