Mammon

related topics
{god, call, give}
{language, word, form}
{film, series, show}
{black, white, people}
{theory, work, human}
{area, part, region}
{math, number, function}

Mammon is a term, derived from the Christian Bible, meaning "dishonest gain".[1] The term is used generally to describe material wealth or greed, most often personified as a deity.

Contents

Definition

Webster's dictionary defines "Mammon" or "Mann" as: 1) the false god of riches and avarice. 2) riches regarded as an object of worship and greedy pursuit; wealth as an evil, more or less personified.[2] Winston defines it to mean: 1) wealth, worldly gain; 2) greed for riches; cupidity.[3] Oxford defines: god of wealth, regarded as evil or immoral; 'those who worship mammon' are equivalent to greedy people who value money too highly.[4]

Etymology

Mammon is a term that was used to describe greed, avarice, and unjust worldly gain in Biblical literature. It was personified as a false god in the New Testament. The term is often used to refer to excessive materialism or greed as a negative influence. Adjectival forms are mammonish and mammonistic.[2][3]

Etymologically, the word is assumed to derive from Late Latin 'mammon', from Greek 'μαμμωνάς', Syriac 'mámóna' (riches),[2] and was an Aramaic loan word in Hebrew meaning wealth[5] although it may also have meant 'that in which one trusts'.[6]

The Greek word for "Mammon", mamonas, occurs in the Sermon on the Mount (during the discourse on ostentation) and in the parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:9-13). The Authorised Version keeps the Syriac word. John Wycliffe uses "richessis".

Personifications

No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other; or else he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You can not serve both God and Mammon.

Full article ▸

related documents
Aos Sí
Ask and Embla
Orcus
Vayu
Wepwawet
Vamana
Gigantes
Samuel (Bible)
Ptah
Enyalius
Igbo mythology
Laocoön
Mares of Diomedes
Bes
Stormbringer
Abracadabra
Asclepius
Duamutef
Wizard (Middle-earth)
Itzamna
Actaeon
Brigid
Veiovis
Ancient of Days
Epimenides
Humpty Dumpty
Sothis
Niobe
Triptolemus
Thriae