Mancala

related topics
{game, team, player}
{@card@, make, design}
{language, word, form}
{god, call, give}
{food, make, wine}
{land, century, early}
{country, population, people}
{area, part, region}
{black, white, people}
{math, number, function}
{church, century, christian}

Mancala is a family of board games played around the world, sometimes called "sowing" games, or "count-and-capture" games, which describes the game-play. Mancala games play a role in many African and some Asian societies comparable to that of chess in the West, or the game of Go in Eastern Asia. The list of mancala games best known in the Western world includes Kalah and Oware. Other games are Congkak, Omweso, Ünee tugaluulakh, Bao, Sungka and Igisoro.

The word mancala comes from the Arabic word naqala meaning literally "to move." There is no one game with the name mancala; instead mancala is a type, or designation, of game. This word is used in Syria, Lebanon, and Egypt, but is not consistently applied to any one game.

In the USA, however, "mancala" is often used as a synonym for the game Kalah.

Contents

General gameplay

Mancala games share a common general game play. Players begin by placing a certain number of seeds, prescribed by the variation in use, in each of the pits on the game board. A player may count their stones to plot the game. A turn consists of removing all seeds from a pit, sowing the seeds (placing one in each of the following pits in sequence), and capturing based on the state of board. This leads to the English phrase "Count and Capture" sometimes used to describe the gameplay. Although the details differ greatly, this general sequence applies to all games.

Equipment

Equipment is typically a board, constructed of various materials, with a series of holes arranged in rows, usually two or four. Some games are more often played with holes dug in the earth, or carved in stone. The holes may be referred to as "depressions", "pits", or "houses". Sometimes, large holes on the ends of the board, called stores, are used for holding the pieces. Playing pieces are seeds, beans, stones, cowry shells, or other small undifferentiated counters that are placed in and transferred about the holes during play. Nickernuts are one common example of pieces used. Board configurations vary among different games but also within variations of a given game; for example Endodoi is played on boards from 2 × 6 to 2 × 10.

With a two-rank board, players usually are considered to control their respective sides of the board, although moves often are made into the opponent's side. With a four-rank board, players control an inner row and an outer row, and a player's seeds will remain in these closest two rows unless the opponent captured them.

Full article ▸

related documents
Upwords
Tien Gow
Elfenland
Alquerque
Irina Privalova
Rush goalie
Lyudmila Kondratyeva
Brains in Bahrain
Bob Arum
Curtly Ambrose
Antichess
Squeeze play (baseball)
Renate Stecher
Burn card
Fight of the Millennium
Annegret Richter
Jerome Mincy
Gareth Owen
Alberto Mercado
Racing de Ferrol
Red Dog
Helen Stephens
Scottish Football League
Alexander Cartwright
Northwest League
Walter Winterbottom
Percy Williams
1964 Summer Olympics
1980 Summer Olympics
Edwin Rosario