Maple (software)

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Maple is a general-purpose commercial computer algebra system. It was first developed in 1980 by the Symbolic Computation Group at the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Since 1988, it has been developed and sold commercially by Waterloo Maple Inc. (also known as Maplesoft), a Canadian company also based in Waterloo, Ontario. The current major version is version 14 which was released in April 2010.

Contents

Overview

Core functionality

Users can enter mathematics in traditional mathematical notation. Custom user interfaces can also be created. There is extensive support for numeric computations, to arbitrary precision, as well as symbolic computation and visualization. Examples of symbolic computations are given below.

Maple incorporates a dynamically typed imperative-style programming language which resembles Pascal[1]. The language permits variables of lexical scope. There are also interfaces to other languages (C, Fortran, Java, MATLAB, and Visual Basic). There is also an interface with Excel.

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